Saturday, February 27, 2016

FINALLY Get Organized! 21st-27th Feb 2016

Finally Get Organized graphic

Blogger DearMYRTLE wants to help genealogists get organized for 2016. She proposes a weekly set of tasks to help us achieve our goal. Ol’ Myrt explains that “Each week's post will feature options for paper and digitally-oriented genealogists, with an eye to the beginner and intermediate researcher.” If you want to participate in this year-long activity, read more about it at FINALLY Get Organized!

Here’s how I’ve completed this week’s tasks.

Task 1. “Add the names and compiled dates of birth, marriage and death for your 4 generations on your surname (if male) or maiden name (if female) in your [4 family group sheets]”.

I created Family Group Sheets for my maiden name (Belair) ancestors in early 2012, so this task is done.

Task 2. “If it takes more than one document to prove a point of fact about an ancestor's life, then attach the relevant documents […]”.

I feel fortunate that I've found all the birth and/or baptism, marriage, and death and/or burial documents for my father, grandfather, great-grandfather, and great-grandfather.

EXTRA CREDIT. “Watch DearMYRTLE's The Written Conclusion Study Group (2015)”.

I watched the video that Myrt featured in this week’s tasks list.

Copyright © 2016, Yvonne Demoskoff.

Friday, February 26, 2016

Friday’s Faces from the Past: Jonathan’s Baptism

My great-nephew Jonathan received the Holy Sacrament of Baptism ten years ago today on 26 February 2006.

Here he is in the arms of Father Eugenio Aloisio, who conferred the Sacrament.

My great-nephew Jonathan at his baptism

Jonathan, who was three and half months old, wore his paternal great-grandfather Maurice’s christening gown. I wrote about our family heirloom in Treasure Chest Thursday: The Christening Gown.

Copyright © 2016, Yvonne Demoskoff.

Monday, February 22, 2016

FINALLY Get Organized! 14th-20th Feb 2016

Finally Get Organized graphic

Blogger DearMYRTLE wants to help genealogists get organized for 2016. She proposes a weekly set of tasks to help us achieve our goal. Ol’ Myrt explains that “Each week's post will feature options for paper and digitally-oriented genealogists, with an eye to the beginner and intermediate researcher.” If you want to participate in this year-long activity, read more about it at FINALLY Get Organized!

Here’s how I’ve completed this week’s tasks.

Task 1. “Rework the citations for documents and photos you've attached to the first four generations on your surname/maiden name individuals.”

I looked over my citations for the first four generations of my Belair line to make sure they were crafted in a “standard, consistent format” (as Myrt explains). I’m happy with the citations I have in those generations, because I used as my guide Evidence Explained: Citing History Sources from Artifacts to Cyberspace, by Elizabeth Shown Mills (Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2007). However, I noticed that some documents don’t have citations, so I made a list of the ones that need them and will get to them in the next few days.

Task 2. “Refer to Citations available online at Elizabeth Shown Mills website.”

Done.

Task 3. “Read ESM's Quick Lesson 22: What Citation Template Do I Use?”

Done.

Task 4. “Download a copy of DearMYRTLE's What Does SHE Say? Study Group citation samples”.

I read the Google document with its citation examples, but didn’t download a copy. Whenever I create a new MS Word document for my genealogy files, say, one for descendants of a particular ancestor, I create at the same time a ‘style sheet’ for my citations. As I add a new citation to my genealogy document (like a baptism record found in the “Drouin Collection” at Ancestry.ca), I go to my style sheet and copy a baptism record example, paste it in my Word document, and then customize it with the appropriate details.

Task 5. “Explore citation templates in your genealogy software of choice.”

Done (in my software Family Tree Maker 2012).

EXTRA Credit. “Watch sessions 3 and 4 of the What Does SHE Say? Study Group”.

Will watch them during this week.

Copyright © 2016, Yvonne Demoskoff.

Saturday, February 20, 2016

Sympathy Saturday: Cousin Gérard

My maternal cousin Gérard Legault passed away on 22 February 2006. I still remember the shock I felt when I was told that Gerry, as he was known to his family, had died suddenly in a car accident.

Gerard Legault

As his sister-in-law spoke of his passing, my thoughts went back to my childhood. I could see in my mind’s eye the many times my family would drive from our home in Timmins to stay the weekend with his family in their big, roomy house in Kirkland Lake. My sister and I had such fun with our cousins – seven boys and one sister – during those carefree days. There were lots of games, lots of teasing, but most of all, lots of laughter. My sister and I were rather quiet girls at home, so it was a treat for us to be surrounded by Richard, Michel, Raymond, Robert, Jean-Paul, Lise, Patrick, and Gérard, who were high-spirited individuals.


Gérard was only 42 years old; he was the youngest of his family. It’s hard to believe that ten years have passed since that fateful day.

Copyright © 2016, Yvonne Demoskoff.

Friday, February 19, 2016

Funeral Card Friday: Dennis Saucier

Dennis Saucier memorial card front
Dennis and I were second cousins. Our parents – my father Maurice and his mother Lucille (Lou) – were the children of Vanasse sisters Julie and Cecilia, respectively.

I first met my cousin, who was known as Butch, when my family was on vacation in Ottawa in the summer of 1969. We stayed at his parents’ home, a brick bungalow on a tree-lined street, during our stay in our nation’s capital.

Dennis was only 54 years old when he died on 24 February 2006. I didn’t attend his funeral, but was given his memorial card a couple of years ago by my Aunt Joan (his mother’s cousin), who received it after the service.

Copyright © 2016, Yvonne Demoskoff.

Wednesday, February 17, 2016

Wedding Wednesday: Desgroseilliers – Nunegand

244 years ago today – on 17 February 1772 – my maternal 4x great-grandparents married. [1]

Joseph Prosper Dorval, later Desgroseiliers (var. Desgroseilliers) and Charlotte Lunegand (var. Nunegand, Beaurosier) were united in matrimony in St-Joachim Roman Catholic church in Châteauguay, southwest of Montreal. He was almost 29 years old and she 17½.

Father Joseph Huguet, a French-born Jesuit, celebrated the nuptial mass. He also served the spiritual needs of the local Iroquois and has the distinction of being “the last of New France’s Jesuit missionaries”. [2]

Joseph and Charlotte had thirteen children born between 1773 and 1795: six sons, six daughters, and one child of unrecorded gender. The family made its home first in Châteauguay, and then in Montreal and later in St-Martin (Laval), before finally returning to Châteauguay.

Joseph died between 1795 and 1800, while Charlotte survived until May 1835.

Desgroseilliers – Nunegand marriage record (p. 36),Généalogie Québec


Desgroseilliers – Nunegand marriage record (p. 37), Généalogie Québec

Transcription of Joseph and Charlotte’s marriage record:

L’an mil sept soixante et douze le seize [dix sept] février, après / la publication de trois bans de Mariage entre Joseph / Prosper Desgroseliers, fils de feu Jean baptiste Desgroseliers / dit Chochouart, et de feu Marie Josephe Lachevretiere, / de la paroisse de Deschampbau, depuis onze ans habitué / à Chateaugai, d’une part; et Charlotte Nunegand, fille / de feu Francois Nunegand, dit Beaurosier et de Louise / Huimete, de la pointe à la Chevelure, habituée depuis / deux ans à Chateaugai, d’autre part, ne s’etant trouvé / 

opposition, je soussigné desservant la dite Paroisse / ai reçu leur mutual consentement et leur ai donné la / Benediction nuptial en presence de Marie Louise / Desgroseliers, soeur de l’Epoux, de Jacques Doret, / de François [Metate?], Jean baptiste Doret fils, de Jean / Besse, beaupere de l’Epouse, de Claude Roland, Charlot / la Roche et de plusieurs autres parens et amis.

[signed] Jos. Huguet Jesuite
Louise [deisgrosilé?]
marie magdeleine doray

My translation of the text:

The year one thousand seven hundred and seventy-two the sixteen [seventeen] February, after / the publication of three banns of Marriage between Joseph / Prosper Desgroseliers, son of the late Jean baptiste Desgroseliers / dit Chochouart, and of the late Marie Joseph Lachevretiere / of the parish of Deschampbau [Deschambault], residing since eleven years / at Chateaugai [Châteauguay], on the one part; and Charlotte Nunegand, daughter / of the late Francois Nunegand, dit Beaurosier and of Louise / Huimete, of the pointe à la Chevelure [aka Fort St-Frederic now Crown Point, NY], residing since / two years at Chateaugai [Châteauguay], on the other part, not having found / 

opposition, I undersigned serving the said Parish / have received their mutual consent and have given them the / nuptial Blessing in the presence of Marie Louise / Desgroseliers, sister of the Groom, of Jacques Doret, / of François [Metate?], Jean baptiste Doret son, of Jean / Besse, stepfather of the Bride, of Claude Roland, Charlot / la Roche and of several other relatives and friends.

[signed] Jos. Huguet Jesuit
Louise [deisgrosilé?]
marie magdeleine doray

Sources:

1. St-Joachim (Châteauguay, Quebec), parish register, 1768-1775, pp. 36-37, no entry no. (1772), Joseph Prosper Desgroseliers – Charlotte Nunegand [sic] marriage, 17 February 1772; St-Joachim parish; digital images, “Le LAFRANCE”, Généalogie Québec (http://www.genealogiequebec.com : accessed 30 June 2015).

2. Joseph Cossette, “Huguet, Joseph”, Dictionary of Canadian Biography, vol. 4, University of Toronto/Université Laval, 2003– (http://www.biographi.ca/en/bio/huguet_joseph_4E.html : accessed 16 February 2016).

Copyright © 2016, Yvonne Demoskoff.

Monday, February 15, 2016

National Flag of Canada Day

Fifty-one years ago today – on 15 February 1965 – Canada’s national flag made its first appearance on Parliament Hill in Ottawa. Before this date, the Canadian Red Ensign represented our country.

Flag of Canada 1965
“First raising of the new Canadian Flag, Centre Block, Parliament Buildings [15 February 1965]”. [1]

Today is also the 20th anniversary of our country’s observance of National Flag of Canada Day. Although not a statutory holiday, Flag Day is celebrated across Canada since 1996. 
We are “invited to celebrate this important symbol of our Canadian identity” through activities such as sharing a photo or a video on social media of ourselves with the flag.
 

National Flag of Canada Day poster

Show your pride in our flag and join in the celebration! For more information, see National Flag of Canada Day.


UPDATE

My husband and I drove around town this afternoon looking for buildings that flew the Flag of Canada and found over a dozen locations. Unfortunately, it was raining and there wasn't much of a breeze. The flag at the local art gallery was fluttering just long enough for us to take our photo; here it is:

Michael and Yvonne with the Flag of Canada

Credits:

1. Duncan Cameron/Duncan Cameron/PA-168019, Library and Archives Canada (http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/lac-bac/search/images : accessed 13 February 2016).

2. Government of Canada (http://canada.pch.gc.ca/eng/1449158599459 : accessed 13 February 2016), “National Flag Day of Canada” poster.

Copyright © 2016, Yvonne Demoskoff.

Sunday, February 14, 2016

Sentimental Sunday: Happy Saint Valentine

While looking for Valentine’s Day memorabilia, I came across this art work I made for my Mom and Dad when I was in elementary school. I signed my name in cursive, so I was probably in Grade 4. (I have another Valentine that I made for my parents in Grade 3, so I must have been older when I did this Valentine.)

Valentine's Day artwork


The simple heart outline with its pre-printed text is surrounded by more hearts and roses. The sheet of paper measures 28 cm x 21.5 cm (11” x 8.5”). It's in fairly good shape, but has yellowed a bit and has a couple of small tears at the top and bottom.

Here’s my translation of the French text:


“Dear parents,
You so good, you so perfect,
Who lavish us with much love,
Dear parents, on this beautiful day,
May God shower upon you His kindness
Happy S[aint] Valentine
Your child who loves you”

This Valentine is one of only two Valentines that I still have from my school days. The first one can be seen at Treasure Chest Thursday: Petit Valentin.

Copyright © 2016, Yvonne Demoskoff.

Saturday, February 13, 2016

FINALLY Get Organized! 7th-13th Feb 2016

FINALLY Get Organized graphic

Blogger DearMYRTLE wants to help genealogists get organized for 2016. She proposes a weekly set of tasks to help us achieve our goal. Ol’ Myrt explains that “Each week's post will feature options for paper and digitally-oriented genealogists, with an eye to the beginner and intermediate researcher.” If you want to participate in this year-long activity, read more about it at FINALLY Get Organized!  

Here’s how I’ve completed this week’s tasks.

Task 1. “Print out and study the synopsis of the GPS Genealogical Proof Standard”.

Printed and studied.

Task 2. “Read the following blog posts, and view the embedded videos”.

I read the blog posts and watched both videos of “What Does She Say?” that Myrt made last summer. To refresh my memory, I also re-read Chapter 1 (Fundamentals of Evidence Analysis) in ESM’s book Evidence Explained. [1]

Myrt says that “From ESM we learn that no source provides definitive proof” and that we need to “look at your own kinship determinations to see where you can find direct sources of information, as opposed to major, principle or key sources”.

I understand that as genealogical researcher, I “can take no record at face value” [2], but I’m confused by the next part of that sentence where I’m asked to “find direct sources of information, as opposed to major, principle or key sources”. Isn’t “direct sources” just another way of saying “major, principle or key sources”?

Task 3. “Make research notes on your to-do list where you now realize your evidence is weak”.

I went over the first four generations in my surname binder (me, my father, his father, and his father) to see if I had any weak evidence and then made notes in my to-do list of what I found. Here is an example:

• Generation 1 (me): I have my birth certificate (short form) and my baptism certificate that show when and where I was born. However, I’ve never requested a copy of my birth registration, which provides more details, including the name of the informant. I’ve decided to order the long form of my birth certificate, because it “is a certified copy of the birth registration”. [3] I can place my order online; the cost is $35 and it should take 15 business days plus delivery time.

As I looked for weak evidence in these four generations, I was surprised to see that I didn’t always cite my sources for my documents. For example, I don’t have source citations for my birth and baptism certificates, as well as those for my father. I also didn’t cite my source for his obituary and I didn’t cite my source for my great-grandfather’s burial certificate (the copy I received from the parish church). I’ve therefore added notes on my to-do list to get these citations done as soon as possible.

Sources:

1. Elizabeth Shown Mills, Evidence Explained: Citing History Sources from Artifacts to Cyberspace (Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2007), 15-38.

2. Mills, Evidence Explained, 33.

3. Service Ontario (https://www.ontario.ca/page/get-or-replace-ontario-birth-certificate#section-4 : accessed 11 February 2016), “Get or replace an Ontario birth certificate”.

Copyright © 2016, Yvonne Demoskoff.

Saturday, February 06, 2016

FINALLY Get Organized! 31 Jan-6 Feb 2016

Get Organized logo

Blogger DearMYRTLE wants to help genealogists get organized for 2016. She proposes a weekly set of tasks to help us achieve our goal. Ol’ Myrt explains that “Each week's post will feature options for paper and digitally-oriented genealogists, with an eye to the beginner and intermediate researcher.” If you want to participate in this year-long activity, read more about it at FINALLY Get Organized!

Here’s how I’ve completed the fifth week’s tasks.

Task 1. “Label oversize tabbed 3-ring dividers as follows […]”.

This task has been done for some years when I first created a surname binder for my mother’s maiden name (Desgroseilliers).

Task 2. “Let's start talking what to do with collateral lines. Yes, those pesky siblings.”

My brother, who appears in my family’s (our parents) family group sheet, now has his own binder to reflect that he is married. My sister now also has a binder for her, her husband and their children. Task done.

Task 3. “It's much easier to keep track of a brother or sister who marry and subsequently have children using your genealogy management program.”

It’s been a long time since I first started keeping track of my ancestors’ siblings. I update the files whenever I find out someone has married, had children, or passed away. However, I’m not sure it’s such a good idea for me to create “additional binders for the married women” among these siblings. These married women belong to fairly large families (think French-Canadian, Roman Catholic families). I’d have more binders than I have actual physical space for them in my computer room, so for now, the married women are staying with their parents’ families instead of breaking out on their own.

Copyright © 2016, Yvonne Demoskoff.