Sunday, July 24, 2016

Church Record Sunday: Angélina Meunier’s 1896 Burial Record

Two years ago, I wrote about my great-grandmother Angélina Meunier; see 52 Ancestors: #7 Angélina Meunier – My great-grandmother. Today, I focus on her burial record on the 120th anniversary of her death.

Angélina died on 26 July 1896, four days after giving birth to her 11th child, a son, who did not survive. Her funeral took place two days later in Sainte-Cécile parish church in Masham (now La Pêche), Quebec.[1]

1896 burial record of Angélina Meunier
Angélina Meunier burial record (Ancestry)
Here’s a close-up version:

1896 burial record of Angélina Meunier
Angélina Meunier burial record, cropped (Ancestry)

The burial record (above) reads in French:

Le vingt-huit Juillet, mil huit cent quatre vingt-seize, nous / soussigné, Curé de cette paroisse, avons inhumé, dans le cime / tière paroissial, le corps d’Angélina Meunier, décédée / l’avant-veille, en cette paroisse, à l’âge de quarante et / un ans, épouse de Pierre Bélair, cultivateur, de cette parois / se. Étaient presents Pierre Bélair, époux de la Défunte, Jo- / seph Pinsonneault, cultivateur, qui n’ont pas su signer; / plusieurs Dames de la Congrégation de Ste. Anne, dont la / Défunte faisait partie, qui ont signé avec nous. Lec / ture faite. [Signatures of twenty-four women belonging to the Dames de la Congrégation de Ste. Anne, followed by the officiating priest.]

My English translation:

The twenty-eight July, one thousand one hundred ninety-six, we / undersigned, [parish priest] of this parish, have interred, in the parochial ceme / tery, the body of Angélina Meunier, deceased / the previous day, in this parish, at the age of forty / one years, spouse of Pierre Bélair, farmer, of the pari / sh. Were present Pierre Bélair, spouse of the Deceased, Jo- / seph Pinsonneault, farmer, [neither of] who knew how to sign [their names]; / several Ladies of the Congregation of Ste. Anne, of which the / Deceased belonged, who signed with us. Reading [of this record] done. [Signatures of twenty-four women belonging to the Dames de la Congrégation de Ste. Anne, followed by the officiating priest.]

Source:

1. Ste-Cécile (Ste-Cécile-de-Masham, Quebec), parish register, 1887-1898, p. 209 verso, entry no. S.20 (1896), Angélina Meunier burial, 28 July 1896; Ste-Cécile-de-Masham parish; digital images, “Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967”, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 1 March 2012).

Copyright © 2016, Yvonne Demoskoff.

Monday, July 11, 2016

Arthur Desgroseilliers (1901-1923)

Arthur Desgroseilliers with brother Eugène and sister Alma
Arthur (right) with his brother Eugène and sister Alma, about 1906

My maternal great-uncle Arthur Desgroseilliers was born on 11 July 1901 in St. Charles, Sudbury District, Ontario. [1] The second son of Albert and Clémentine (Léveillé) Desgroseilliers, Arthur had thirteen siblings: ten brothers (including my grandfather Eugène) and three sisters.
Baptism record of Arthur Desgroseilliers
Arthur Desgroseilliers baptism record (Ancestry)

He was baptised “Ovide-Arthur” on 14 July 1901 by Father G.A. Picotte of St-Thomas Apôtre Church in Warren, Sudbury District, Ontario. [2] I’m not sure if three-day-old Arthur was taken to Warren to be baptised or if Father Picotte travelled to St. Charles to perform the ceremony. It seems more likely that the priest went to St. Charles and then recorded the details in his church’s sacramental register once back in Warren. Arthur’s godparents were Arthur Gervais (husband of his aunt Emma Desgroseilliers) and Euphémie Desgroseilliers (Emma’s younger sister).

The Desgroseilliers family lived in St. Charles from 1900 to about 1917, but spent one or two years (1906-1908) in Cobalt, a mining community northeast of St. Charles, near the Ontario-Quebec border. It was here that Arthur’s little sister Alma died from bronchitis in July 1907. [3] (See her story in Wednesday’s Child: Alma Desgroseilliers (1904-1907).)

In June 1911, Arthur was enumerated on that year’s federal census as a 10-year-old boy in his parents’ household. [4] The family lived on concession 2 in Appleby Township in Nipissing District. His father Albert was a farmer, while Arthur and his brother Eugène were school students. The two boys and their parents could read and write and they all spoke French.

About 1917, Arthur and his family moved north to the village of Moonbeam in Cochrane District. His three youngest brothers, Ovide, Ovila and Joseph, were born there.

When searching for Arthur on the 1921 census, I found him in two locations. First, he and the Desgroseilliers family were enumerated in one household on lot 12, concession 1 in Fauquier Township, except for Arthur, who’s on lot 14, concession 2. He was a farmer. [5] Second, he was enumerated in his own household in Jackson Bay in nearby Kendrey Township. [6] His home, which he rented, was a one-room wood structure. According to the census, Arthur could not read nor write. He earned $600 as a laborer in the past twelve months.

In the early years when I was researching my great-grandparents and their family, I didn’t know when Arthur died. I had the chance to ask his brother Ovila when he visited my parents in August 1990. Great-uncle Ovila told me that Arthur was 18 years old when he died in Kapuskasing of typhoid fever. A few years later, I found a mention of his death in a local history book stating that Arthur died on 10 May 1922. [7]
Death registration of Arthur Desgroseilliers
Arthur Desgroseilliers death registration, top portion (Ancestry)
Death registration of Arthur Desgroseilliers
Arthur Desgroseilliers death registration, bottom portion (Ancestry)

I recently found Arthur’s death registration at Ancestry.ca. It gave his date and place of death as 10 May 1923 in Spruce Falls (Power and Paper) Company Hospital in Kapuskasing, Cochrane District, Ontario. [8] The cause of death was typhoid fever with broncho-pneumonia as a contributory factor. [9] He was ill for at least five days before he succumbed to the disease.

What is typhoid fever? Typhoid fever is an infectious disease that “spreads through contaminated food and water or through close contact with someone who's infected. Signs and symptoms usually include high fever, headache, abdominal pain, and either constipation or diarrhea.” [10]

In early 1923, a typhoid epidemic was raging in northern Ontario, particularly in the town of Cochrane. Arthur might have become ill by eating or drinking contaminated food or water. Cochrane’s water was compromised that year when “sewage [… was] drawn into the city’s water system”. [11] Alternatively, Arthur might have come into contact with someone affected with the disease in Cochrane or closer to his home.

In early April 1923, other cases of typhoid appeared in communities northwest of Cochrane like Smooth Rock Falls, Kapuskasing and Hearst in the province of Ontario and east in Amos in the province of Quebec. [12]

The epidemic lasted until the end of May. In all, “over 953 cases [of typhoid fever] from Cochrane and adjoining municipalities with some 84 deaths” were reported. [13] Children and adults, male and female alike, between the ages of 5 and 25 were “particularly affected”. [14]

Arthur was buried on 11 May 1923 in Moonbeam. [15] He was only 21 years old (he would turn 22 that July) and unmarried. His death must have been a great loss for his family.

Sources:

1. St-Thomas Apôtre (Warren, Ontario), parish register, 1901-1967, no page no., entry no. 31 (1901), Ovide-Arthur Desgroseillers (written as Ovide-Arthur Desgroseillers, indexed as Ovide Arthur Desgroseillers) baptism, 14 July 1901; St-Thomas Apôtre parish; digital images, “Ontario, Canada, Catholic Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1747-1967”, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 4 February 2016). Also, “Ontario, Canada, Deaths, 1869-1938 and Deaths Overseas, 1939-1947”, digital images, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 20 May 2013), entry for Arthur DesGroseilliers (written as Arthur DesGroseilliers, indexed as Arthur Desgroselliers), 10 May 1923; citing Archives of Ontario, Registrations of Deaths, 1869-1938; Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Archives of Ontario; microfilm series MS935, reel 999.


2. St-Thomas Apôtre, parish register, 1901-1967, no page no., Ovide-Arthur Desgroseillers baptism, 14 July 1901.


3. “Ontario, Canada Deaths, 1869-1932”, digital image, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 20 January 2012), entry for Alma Degrossalier [sic], 6 July 1907; citing Archives of Ontario, Registrations of Deaths, 1869-1932; Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Archives of Ontario; microfilm series MS935, reel 131.


4. 1911 census of Canada, Appleby, Hawley [Townships], Nipissing, Ontario, population schedule, enumeration district 3, p. 1, dwelling 8, family 8, Albert Deapeniallin (written as Desgros[iallier?], indexed as Deapeniallin) household; digital images, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 9 May 2016); citing Census of Canada, 1911, microfilm reels T-20326 to T-20460; Library and Archives Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.


5. 1921 census of Canada, Fauquier Township, Temiskaming, Ontario, population schedule, subdistrict 75, p. 15, dwelling 123, family 123, Albert Desgrosellier (written as Albert Desgrosellier, indexed as Albert Desgroseillier) household; digital images, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 9 May 2016); citing Library and Archives Canada, Sixth Census of Canada, 1921; Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Library and Archives Canada, 2013; Series RG31; Statistics Canada Fonds.


6. 1921 census of Canada, Bradhurn, Syders, Haggart, Kendry, Alexandra (Townships), Temiskaming, Ontario, population schedule, subdistrict 73, p. 2, dwelling 123, family 123, Art DesGroseilliers (written as Art DesGroseilliers, indexed as Art Desgroseillers) household; digital images, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 9 May 2016); citing Library and Archives Canada, Sixth Census of Canada, 1921; Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Library and Archives Canada, 2013; Series RG31; Statistics Canada Fonds.


7. Lionel Séguin, Historique de la paroisse Saint-Charles (Saint-Charles, Ont., 1945: 228); digital images, Our Roots (http://www.ourroots.ca/ : accessed 18 June 2013).

8. FICHES DE DÉCÈS/SÉPULTURES Kapuskasing DEATH/BURIAL RECORDS 1915 – 2010, database (http://kapuskasingdeathrecords.com/default.htm : accessed 4 February 2016), death entry for Arthur Desgroseilliers, 10 May 1923) and “Ontario, Canada, Deaths, 1869-1938 and Deaths Overseas, 1939-1947”, digital images, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 20 May 2013), entry for Arthur DesGroseilliers, 10 May 1923.

9. “Ontario, Canada, Deaths, 1869-1938 and Deaths Overseas, 1939-1947”, digital images, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 20 May 2013), entry for Arthur DesGroseilliers, 10 May 1923.

10. “Typhoid Fever”, database, Mayo Clinic (http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/typhoid-fever/basics/definition/CON-20028553 : accessed 9 May 2016).

11. “Cochrane Has Now 500 Sick; Epidemic Grows”, The Ottawa (Ontario, Canada) Evening Journal, 31 March 1923, p. 1; digital images, Newspapers.com (http://www.newspapers.com : accessed 9 May 2016).

12. “Death List Growing Cochrane Epidemic”, The Ottawa (Ontario, Canada) Evening Journal, 4 April 1923, p. 13; digital images, Newspapers.com (http://www.newspapers.com : accessed 9 May 2016).

13. Forty-second Annual Report of the Provincial Board of Health of Ontario, Canada for the year 1923 (Toronto: Clarkson W. James, 1924, 280 and 54); digital images, University of Toronto (http://scans.library.utoronto.ca/pdf/4/39/ontariodepthealth1923ontauoft/ontariodepthealth1923ontauoft.pdf : accessed 9 May 2016).

14. Forty-second Annual Report of the Provincial Board of Health of Ontario, Canada, 34.

15. “Ontario, Canada, Deaths, 1869-1938 and Deaths Overseas, 1939-1947”, digital images, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 20 May 2013), entry for Arthur DesGroseilliers, 10 May 1923. Also, Moonbeam Cemetery, database and digital images (http://cimetiere.moonbeam.ca/dEn.html : accessed 12 September 2013), entry for Arthur Desgroseillers [sic], Moonbeam, Ontario. However, another source states that Arthur was buried on 11 May 1923 in Immaculée-Conception Cemetery in Kapuskasing. (FICHES DE DÉCÈS/SÉPULTURES Kapuskasing DEATH/BURIAL RECORDS 1915 – 2010, database (http://kapuskasingdeathrecords.com/default.htm : accessed 4 February 2016), death entry for Arthur Desgroseilliers, 10 May 1923.)

Copyright © 2016, Yvonne Demoskoff.

Sunday, July 03, 2016

Champlain founds Quebec in 1608

Samuel de Champlain – ‘founder and leader of the first permanent French settlements in North America’ – arrived at Kebec on 3 July 1608. [1] He had visited this place five years earlier, but after a fresh exploration of the area overlooking the St. Lawrence River, he decided it would be an ideal location for a permanent settlement.

Habitation de Quebec
Habitation de Québec (1613)

Champlain’s men began to clear the land that same day. They built a storehouse for trade and provisions and a large wooden structure that Champlain called the habitation. A sort of fort-complex, the habitation consisted of three interconnected buildings, with a residence for Champlain, quarters for his settlers and their workshops, and even space for a dovecote. The flag of France flew over the establishment. [2]

Today, this site is Quebec City. It celebrated its 400th anniversary in 2008.

Sources:

Image credit: “Abitation de Quebecq [document cartographique]”, Library and Archives Canada.

1. David Hackett Fischer, Champlain’s Dream (Alfred A. Knopf Canada, 2008), 6.

2. Fischer, Champlain’s Dream, 244.

Copyright © 2016, Yvonne Demoskoff.

Church Record Sunday: Marie-Antoinette Chouart’s 1731 Burial Record

July 5, 2016 marks the 285th anniversary of the death of my 7x maternal great-grandmother, Marie-Antoinette Chouart.

A daughter of intrepid explorer Médard Chouart, sieur des Groseilliers, Marie-Antoinette was born in June 1661 in Trois-Rivières.

In November 1677, Marie-Antoinette entered into a marriage contract with Jean Jalot, originally from Picardie, France, by whom she had eight children. Jean was killed by the Iroquois in July 1690. Five years later, Marie-Antoinette married Jean-Baptiste Bouchard dit Dorval in Montreal on 19 December 1695. The couple had six children, including son Jean-Baptiste (1698-1755), my ancestor.

1731 burial record of Marie-Antoinette Chouart
Marie-Antoinette Chouart's burial record (Généalogie Québec.com)

Marie-Antoinette died on 5 July 1731. The officiating priest, Cheze, recorded that she died at ten or two o’clock (the handwriting is difficult to read) in the morning. She was buried the next day in Montreal’s Notre-Dame cemetery. [1]

Her burial record (above) reads in French:


Le Sixieme Jour du mois de Juillet de L’annee / mil sept cent trente et un a ete inhumée dans le / cimetière [pres de] l’eglise le corps de marie antoinette / chouar agée de soixante et dix ans veuve de Jean / baptiste bouchart dit dorval, decedee le Jour precedent / vers les dix [deux?] heures du matin. ont ete present [?] Deat prêtre et talbot ecclesiatique qui ont Signé / avec nous[signed Deat / Talbot / Cheze]

My English translation:


The Sixth Day of the month of July of the year / one thousand thirty one was buried in the / cemetery [near the] church the body of marie antoinette / chouar aged seventy years widow of Jean / baptiste bouchart dit dorval, died the previous day / about ten [two?] hours of the morning. were present Deat priest and talbot ecclesiastic who have Signed [their names] with us[signed Deat / Talbot / Cheze]

Source:

1. Notre-Dame (Montreal, Quebec), parish register, 1726-1733, p. 133 recto, no entry no. (1731), Marie Antoinette Chouar [sic] burial, 6 July 1731; Notre-Dame parish; digital images, “Le LAFRANCE”, Généalogie Québec (http://www.genealogiequebec.com : accessed 18 December 2014).

Copyright © 2016, Yvonne Demoskoff.

Friday, July 01, 2016

Happy Canada Day!


Happy Birthday, Canada!



Today is Canada’s 149th birthday.
Have a safe and happy July 1st holiday, everyone!
Joyeuse fête du Canada, tout le monde!


Copyright © 2016, Yvonne Demoskoff.

Friday, June 24, 2016

Funeral Card Friday: Agnes Burchill

Front of In Memory card for Agnes Burchill

Agnes Burchill was the youngest sister of my paternal grandmother Julie (Vanasse) Belair.

“Aunt Aggie”, as my late father knew her, lived in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada since the late-1930s. I think the only time I met her was when my family and I were there on vacation, probably in the 1980s. We visited her and her husband “Uncle Freddie” at their apartment in a multi-storied building one afternoon. It was a real pleasure to meet my great-aunt because she was a connection to my beloved Mémère Julie. I was researching my family tree at this time, so I came prepared with questions for Aggie and Freddie. Unfortunately, I don’t know what happened to those notes and now remember very little about that visit.

Youngest child and youngest daughter of Olivier and Elizabeth (Vanasse) Vanasse, Agnes was born on 12 September 1905 in Chapeau, Pontiac County, Quebec. She had eight older siblings: Mary, George, William, Cecilia, Julie (my grandmother), Joseph, Corine and David.

Back of In Memory card for Agnes Burchill

Agnes died on 28 June 2000, Freddie having predeceased her in November 1989. They were both laid to rest at Capital Funeral Home & Cemetery in Ottawa.

Copyright © 2016, Yvonne Demoskoff.

Friday, June 10, 2016

Friday’s Faces from the Past: Jacqueline and her godchild

Jacqueline Belair with her sister Jeanne d'arc and her niece Kathy

Aunt Joan stands next to my Mom Jacqueline, who is holding her well-wrapped three-week-old niece and godchild Kathy. The photo was taken outside of Joan’s home on 9 June 1968. That’s the day when Katherine Anne, first child of Lino and Jeanne d’arc (Joan), was baptised at Sacred Heart RC Church in Timmins. Kathy’s godparents were her maternal aunt Jackie and her paternal uncle Rino.

I love the 1960s fashion. Mom and Aunt Joan wear a single-strand pearl necklace, Mom has gloves and I’m sure Joan did too, although we can’t see them in this picture.

My sister Marianne and I probably attended our new cousin’s baptism ceremony and the small family get-together afterwards, but I don’t have any memories of the day.

The photo was in Kathy’s family album and she let me scan it when I visited her in May 2014. It’s a touching memento of her with my Mom as her godmother.

Copyright © 2016, Yvonne Demoskoff.

Wednesday, June 01, 2016

The 1921 Census of Canada and My Ancestors

A few weeks ago, I wrote an article about my ancestors who appeared on the 1901 census of Canada. Today – 1 June 2016 – is the 95th anniversary of the 1921 Census of Canada. I decided to see which ancestors appear on that census, the most recent one publicly available. Here is what I found.

Youngest

My grandmother Juliette Beauvais was 19 years old (she turned 20 at the end of the month) on the census. [1] She is on line no. 34 in the image below. Juliette and her parents Joseph, a farmer, and Olivine lived in Hartwell (now Chénéville), Quebec. All the family members were born in Quebec according to the census, including elder son Oscar, although he was born in Tupper Lake, New York, USA. The family was French, Canadian, and Roman Catholic. Juliette and some of her brothers could read and write, but their parents could not. They all spoke French; no one could speak English.
Juliette Beauvais on 1921 census of Canada
Juliette Beauvais with her family on the 1921 census of Canada (Ancestry)

Joseph owned his home (it was not rented). He, his wife and their fourteen children lived in a four-room single-family house of wood. The enumerator visited and counted the family on 24 June 1921, although the official enumeration date was 1 June 1921.

Oldest

My great-great-grandfather Joseph Léveillé was 81 years old on the census. [2] He and his wife Cordélia lived with their younger daughter Adélaïde in South Indian (now Limoges), Ontario. Joseph and Cordélia were born in the province of Quebec, while Adélaïde was born in the province of Ontario. They were French, Canadian, and Roman Catholic. Joseph was a farmer on his own farm and Adélaïde was the family’s housekeeper. Joseph spoke English and French, but he couldn’t read or write.
Joseph Leveille on 1921 census of Canada
Joseph Léveillé with his family on the 1921 census of Canada (Ancestry)

Joseph owned his four-room single-family house constructed of wood. The enumerator seems to have neglected to date the form, but the official census day was 1 June 1921.

Other Ancestors

• Grandparents: Julie Vanasse and Eugène Desgroseilliers; both lived in the province of Quebec.

• Great-grandparents: Pierre Belair, Olivier and Elisabeth (Vanasse) Vanasse, Albert and Clémentine (Léveillé) Desgroseilliers, and Joseph and Olivine (Hotte) Beauvais. Albert and Clémentine lived in the province of Ontario, while the others lived in the province of Quebec.

• Great-great-grandparents: Cordélia (Racette) Léveillé, widow Arline (Deschatelets) Beauvais, and widower Louis Hotte. Cordélia lived in Ontario, while Arline and Louis lived in Quebec.

Ancestor Not Found

Living, but missing from the census is my grandfather Fred Belair.

Some Census Statistics

• 13,000 enumerators were required, including war veterans and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP).
• The information on the forms “were transferred to punch cards and tabulated by machines”.
• There were five schedules (population, agriculture, animals […] not on farms, manufacturing and trade, and a supplemental schedule for the blind and deaf-mutes) and 565 questions. [3]

Sources:

1. 1921 census of Canada, Hartwell and Preston (Township), Labelle, Quebec, population schedule, subdistrict 2, p. 23, dwelling 195, household 195, Joseph Beauvais family (written as Joseph Beauvais, indexed as Joseph Beavens); digital image, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 25 May 2016); citing Sixth Census of Canada, 1921, Library and Archives Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, Series RG31, Statistics Canada Fonds.

2. 1921 census of Canada, Cambridge (Township), Russell, Ontario, population schedule, subdistrict 3, p. 9, dwelling 70, household 70, Joseph Leveille [sic] family; digital image, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 25 May 2016); citing Sixth Census of Canada, 1921, Library and Archives Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, Series RG31, Statistics Canada Fonds.

3. Dave Obee, Counting Canada: A Genealogical Guide to the Canadian Census, by Dave Obee (Victoria, BC: Dave Obee, 2012), 163.

Copyright © 2016, Yvonne Demoskoff.